Urban Velo

Velocity Bottle Trap

Back in the day, Velocity was well known for their bottle cages as well as their rims. The high quality alloy cages were made one at a time on one machine tucked away in a shed somewhere in Australia. As time wore on, the wheel business took more and more of the spotlight, and for reasons that I can’t quite recall (I heard the story after a few beers in Las Vegas) that old bottle cage machine was retired.

Fast forward to recent times and Velocity still makes bottle cages in Australia, only now they’re composite. The new ones are inexpensive and light weight—they weigh just 29 grams. And they stack nicely for shipping and storage, which is a boon to bike shops and bodes well for the environment.

Not surprisingly, given Velocity’s track record, the cage works well. Perhaps the only criticism I can level against it is that unlike most bottle cages, the Velocity Bottle Trap doesn’t stretch to accept larger bottles, nor does it handle smaller than average bottles well.

The Velocity Bottle Trap retails for about $8 and is available in black, white, navy, yellow, red, green, orange, purple, blue, bronze and silver. Visit www.velocityusa.com for more info.

About Urban Jeff

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6 Comments

  1. Ghost RiderMay 4, 2010 at 7:38 am

    So does that mean my pink Velocity wire cages are now collector’s items? ;)

  2. Fatty McBastardMay 4, 2010 at 1:31 pm

    HAHAHA!!! (shudder) Four MAXX! Yikes… Ever since that first PGH Tourney, I can’t touch that stuff.

  3. ChrisMay 4, 2010 at 5:01 pm

    So the good part is it holds “average” sized bottles. What an innovation. I guess at least hipsters will be OK rockin ‘em since they match the sweet colorway of their NJS “Tarck” bike. Rolls eys.

  4. nicholasMay 4, 2010 at 7:05 pm

    chris,”the [water bottle cages] are inexpensive and light weight—they weigh just 29 grams. And they stack nicely for shipping and storage, which is a boon to bike shops and bodes well for the environment.” That last bit refers to the fact that more of them can fit in a smaller space, which isn’t necessarily beneficial to the end user, but it indicates an acknowledgment of the life cycle of the things. So I would think that the quoted segment is “the good part.”

    People on these comment threads get really worked up about new products not being innovative, but I think it is good that many companies can produce and provide similar products, so we consumers have options. If you’re so concerned about innovation, innovate some of your own witticisms, rather than recycling BSNYC’s .

  5. jamesmallonMay 7, 2010 at 2:09 pm

    By composite you mean plastic, right? Call a spade a spade. Btw: plastic cages snap in Canadian winter (Milwaukee and Chicago too).

  6. Recherche portes-bouteilles costaux! (acier)September 25, 2012 at 5:48 am

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