Urban Velo

One Hundred For Haiti Bike Campaign

haitiThe relief and development organization, One Hundred For Haiti, just celebrated a successful fundraising campaign where they were able to purchase bikes for a group of rescued, former child slaves currently living in a safe house. Their blog describes the campaign as such,

Holli Griffiths, Project Manager, returned from Haiti last month having met a group of young boys who were former child slaves. She was so struck by their courage and experiences – all of them teenagers and pre-teens – and in sharing their story the idea came up to buy them bicycles so that they could live as kids are supposed to live: having fun, laughing, and working less hard to get to school and to meet one another.

Read more about the work that One Hundred For Haiti does here and view all the bike campaign photos on Facebook here.

About Scott Spitz

Commuting, touring, kid hauling, couriering, mechanic work, sales, advocacy, fixed, free—Scott has had his hands in it all over the years.

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One Comment

  1. BrianFebruary 13, 2013 at 11:38 pm

    I’m sorry, but this is not good development. These people have good intentions, but the organization has a weak mission that lends itself to “projects” that are just dreamt up. From their blog:

    “She was so struck by their courage and experiences – all of them teenagers and pre-teens – and in sharing their story the idea came up to buy them bicycles so that they could live as kids are supposed to live: having fun, laughing, and working less hard to get to school and to meet one another.”

    “The idea came up”??? Who came up with that idea? Did this orphanage say that their top priority was buying the kids bikes? Look, if you want to go to some foreign country and do nice things, then do that, but please don’t call it development or a “success” just because you raised money, bought something, and handed it over.

    Were these children taught anything about bike maintenance? Do they have the basic tools and supplies to do bike maintenance? What will prevent these bikes from being stolen? Were they given locks? If these questions weren’t addressed, that’s a clear sign of negligence and in my opinion misuses of funds. Unfortunately, this organization’s website says nothing about this “idea.”

    If you think this critique is especially harsh, then go to Haiti (or many many other countries) and start listening to community organizations. They see groups fly in all the time with random things that Haitian don’t need/can get on their own if it’s a priority. I hope this organization starts narrowing their focus and not doing things on a whim.

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