Urban Velo

Hub Spacing

Hub spacing varies front to rear and bike to bike, and is an important consideration in parts and frame compatibility. Spacing is measured from the outside faces of the hub locknuts or axle-ends or the inside faces of the frame dropouts or fork ends, and is commonly referred to as the O.L.D or over lock-nut distance. In general front hub spacing has stayed pretty steady over the years, with rear hub spacing increasing gradually as deraileur systems add gears.

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Issue #39 – Available Online

Download39 cover

Contents Include: Interbike and Eurobike Product Spotlight, Powderhorn 24, Urban Cycling Hall of Fame, I Love Riding in the City, Latvia’s Cycling Renaissance, Hub Spacing, The CPSC And Me, Vincent Rodriguez, All-City, Dahon, Fyxation, Light & Motion, Avid, NiteRider and more.

Download it for free, purchase it from the Apple Store or order a printed copy online.

Tradeshow Product Spotlight

Gravel racing is hot, with Raleigh jumping in with the disc brake equipped Tamland 2. With a longer offset fork and a slightly extended wheelbase as compared to a cyclocross bike the Tamland is just as at home on epic rides or as a daily commuter. The bike has a double butted Reynolds 631 steel frame and Ultegra-level spec and a serious enthusiast or pro-commuter price of $2400.

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Urban Velo #38 Print Copies Available

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uv38print

After a short delay at the printer, paper copies of Urban Velo #38 are now available. Pick one up at your local shop next week, or order one direct for a few dollars and have it delivered to your door. As always, you can view the entire magazine online for free at urbanvelo.org/download, no catch.

Contents include: I Love Riding in the City, Product Spotlight, Alleycat Explosion, Gallery: The Bike Messengers, Product Reviews, The Cheetah: Nelson Vails, Denver’s ReCyclery Café, Cycling Legalese, Rim Brake Maintenance, Fixed Without Dix.

Price: $2.00

Denver’s ReCyclery Cafe

My first step into the ReCyclery Café caused a moment of gear-head geek out. Just about everything was once another man’s trash and, in most cases, that trash was a piece of a bicycle. Combination bike and coffee shops aren’t new in Denver, entrepreneurs have begun to realize they can squeeze everything Colorado cyclists want into one storefront: coffee, beer, quick healthy food, and a solid repair shop. The ReCyclerly Café in Denver’s thriving Capitol Hill neighborhood stands out among the pack.

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The Cheetah: Nelson Vails

Nelson Vails got his nickname “The Cheetah” from an announcer at a race at the Lehigh Valley Velodrome in Trexlertown, Pennsylvania early in his racing career—a career that includes racing professionally in Europe and Japan, induction into the Cycling Hall Of Fame, a silver medal in the 1984 Olympic Games, and it all began as a bicycle messenger. I met him at Toga Bicycle Shop in New York City, where Nelson Vails was having a party to preview his cycling clothing line and working with a film crew on a documentary film about his life called “The Cheetah: The Nelson Vails Story.”

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Alleycat Explosion

Today nearly everyone and their cousin has heard stories of infamous alleycat races—of messengers jetting between cars and skidding through intersections, reckless and crazed, like a sharknado on bikes. In the last decade, alleycats have gone from underground to ordinary, almost de rigueur. Races like Monster Track, Quake City Rumble and Stupor Bowl have established themselves as long-standing traditions, while countless others in cities across the country are one-and-done affairs of varying size and intensity.

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Issue #38 – Available Online

Contents Include: I Love Riding in the City, Product Spotlight, Alleycat Explosion, Gallery: The Bike Messengers, Product Reviews, The Cheetah: Nelson Vails, Denver’s ReCyclery Café, Cycling Legalese, Rim Brake Maintenance, Fixed Without Dix

Download it for free, purchase it from the Apple Store or order a printed copy online.

Who Loves Riding In The City?

ILRITCWe always hear, “I love that section in your magazine…” but believe it or not, we don’t get nearly enough contributions to I Love Riding In The City. And we’re not overly picky, but we do look for thoughtful, heartfelt answers and a high-resolution photograph that shows you, preferably on or with your bike.

Fill out the form below, or just email us your answers (along with a high-res photo).




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Or just say whatever you want about riding in the city… Poetry anyone?

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Penrose Velodrome

They say that track racing is one of the most addictive types of bike racing. Over and over people say once you take a lap on the velodrome you’ll be hooked forever. Fixed gear culture has exploded over the past 10 years, and much of this popularity can be attributed to things like the allure of the bike messenger, the aesthetic of the fixed gear bike and the ability to customize it. Most riders aren’t familiar with the roots of the track bike and racing on the velodrome, and St. Louis is no different. Until now.

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