Urban Velo

Co.Exist: The Cities That Spend The Most On Bike Lanes Later Reap The Most Reward

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Co.Exist posted an article last week exploring a recent study out of New Zealand showing that for every dollar a city spends today on creating separated bike lanes, up to $24 could be saved in future pollution and healthcare costs.

They found huge differences: If the city built a network of separated lanes and slowed down traffic speeds, it could increase cycling by 40% by 2040, but adding a few lanes in a few places might only increase bike traffic by 5%. The more people ride, the more the cost savings would add up for Auckland–the biggest factor being a reduction in health care costs. A smaller investment would have little impact at all; the city is so bike-unfriendly that major changes are needed.

Though the study focused on Auckland, the researchers think that the general principles would apply to other cities where cars rule the road. “Auckland is very similar in design and transport patterns to many US cities, so we expect our findings to be relevant to the US,” MacMillan explains. The exact savings would be different; the study wasn’t trying to predict exact numbers, but show how different scenarios compare to each other.

Read the entire article at www.fastcoexist.com

East Atlanta Kids Club Brownwood Bike Rally

Adobe Photoshop PDF The East Atlanta Kids Club is celebrating their 10th Annual Brownwood Bike Rally on September 6th. Free kids events and races, safety check, and a helth and fitness fair along with street and ‘cross races for the kid-like adults. Proceeds will benefit the East Atlanta Kids Club, a nonprofit after-school tutoring and mentoring program for promising youth.

Urban Velo Wants You To Contribute

contribute420Urban Velo wants you to contribute. Show off your hometown, share your images, help report on urban cycling culture.

Writers: Urban Velo is always looking for new voices and perspectives to bring to the pages and report on news and trends in urban cycling. From feature length news stories and signature event reports, to cycling controversy and rider profiles we’re looking for fresh ideas and writers. Look through our free archive of Urban Velo back issues, get in contact with a pitch or story draft with brad@urbanvelo.org

Photographers: There are a lot of great photographers documenting cycling culture, and we’d like to feature your work. Every issue features a 5-page gallery — sometimes a particular event, other times a collection showing off selections spanning years of work. News and event photography can find an outlet with online galleries and in print features, especially if paired with a story pitch. We’re always looking for a stunning cover image. Email brad@urbanvelo.org with your gallery samples and ideas.

Aaron Edge Interview

Disclaimer : This is an interview I conducted and posted on my personal blog – Run Vegan
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Aaron Edge was a co-founder of the cycling, altitude-driven lifestyle brand, Upness, which is no more. He has been battling the effects of MS for the past year and a half now, primarily through a combination of medicine and physical activity, namely his cycling passion. In this interview, he lays it all out with blunt honesty and no punches pulled, giving the reader a more human perspective on living with disease and what that means both physically and emotionally.

Hell’s Belles 3 Barcelona Player Portraits

_MG_7812_Hell’s Belles is a European women’s bike polo tournament, with the third running happening in November 2013 in Barcelona. Olivier Minh was on hand and shot a great assortment of black and white portraits of the tournament competitors, posted in full at www.olivier-minh.fr While almost a year old, the images are well worth flipping through.

Survival Bike

I’m not sure if the engine can be turned off in the event of apocalyptic gas shortages, enabling straight drivetrain engagement…but let’s just pretend.
surival bike

From their disclaimer:

Operating this motorized bicycle or bicycle engine kit involves some risk of bodily injury…We are not responsible for injuries and/or damages resulting from operating this motorized bicycle or bicycle engine kit…Obey all traffic regulations. Always wear a helmet while riding. Remember that you are riding a motorized bicycle and other traffic may not be able to see you. Never operate your motorized bicycle on a pedestrian through way or sidewalk while the engine is running.

In the event of apocalypse…all disclaimer advice is irrelevant.

Via Motopeds

Gevenalle BURD Cyclocross Front Derailleur

cxf_burned-300x287 Gevenalle (the artist formerly known as Retroshift) introduced the Blatantly Upgraded Rear Derailleur a couple of seasons back, taking a Microshift rear derailleur, swapping some pulleys and increasing the chain spring tension and giving riders a reasonably priced derailleur alternative better tuned for the grit of cyclocross. Now comes the Blatantly Upgraded and Rebranded Derailleur for the front shifting duties, this again uses a Microshift derailleur, this time their top-end road unit with a swapped out cage. Gevenalle removed the flimsy carbon cage and replaced it with a stiffer steel unit better tuned to the smaller double chainring sets on cyclocross, gravel riding and pro-commuter type bikes. The rear derailleur is available starting at $69, with the front derailleur $50 in either braze-on or clamp-on mounts, with economical crash replacement policies on each. See more BURD at www.gevenalle.com.

Maestro Frameworks and Adaptive Bicycles

pedal shop aug14 Local to Urban Velo framebuilder Michael Brown of Maestro Frameworks is making a name for himself building adaptive bikes, namely for Mike Trimble, a man born without arms in the wake of the Chernobyl accident who is now able to ride for pleasure and transportation. Pittsburgh Magazine ran an article about their project, and their plans to ride the 350+ miles to Washington DC together.

Early retirement from Columbia Gas in 2009 gave him an opportunity to focus solely on bikes. He apprenticed under Mike Flanigan, a legendary Boston-area bike builder, before opening Maestro Frameworks in 2011, commuting by bike from his Squirrel Hill home.

People with disabilities started seeking him out. “I didn’t go out of my way to look for this market, but people keep finding me to do custom things that nobody else would touch,” Brown says.

A Pittsburgh woman with one short arm, on which her hand protrudes from her elbow, asked Brown if he could get her on two wheels for the first time in her life. He designed a bike that allowed her to shift gears with her longer arm while resting the shorter one on a modified handlebar. He also built a bike for a young man with dwarfism who had been riding ill-fitting children’s bikes and was ecstatic to ride a high-performance bike that fit him.

Then came Trimble’s request — at that time Brown’s biggest engineering challenge to date. To design the steering system, Brown says he sat on the bike and imagined that he had no arms. His first prototype extended the bar to underneath the armpit, but that made Trimble lean to the right. The second version, which Trimble controlled with his stump, allowed him to steer.

Read the whole article at www.pittsburghmagazine.com

Bikeable Zoo

zoo2Let’s be real here…this is NOT going to happen, but sometimes design firms have too many workers and need to keep them occupied, so they pitch ideas that tend to be a little far-fetched. Maybe I’m being overly cynical here, but let’s entertain the idea of this project regardless. The Danish design firm BIG pitched a concept for overhauling the current zoo in Givskund, Denmark. In this redesign, they have spectators viewing the animals in a more direct manner, but with less perceived intrusion. One way they do this is by having people riding in, what look like, bubble bikes, with a mirrored surface so the people can’t be seen by the animals.

My first thought when I saw this design was, “Have you ever seen an animal look at itself in the mirror?” That never turns out good. I can imagine a primate or other predator animal feeling threatened by the reflection and attacking the bubble bikes, knocking them over and pounding the crap out of them. But hey, that will be an animal encounter a young child will never forget.

Then there are the mechanical issues. What happens with flat tires, broken chains, operators ignoring the red lights of the jungle and speeding through a herd’s attempt at an enclosed stampede?

Ok, I kid. Let’s look at the pictures of the Jetson’s bikes we’ll be riding in the future.
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Via AnimalNewYork

The Story of the ShurSave Bike Racks

Will-Simmons-letter-to-Shursave-620x878From BikePGH:

I do my grocery shopping by bicycle probably seven months out of the year and it’s a total bummer that I have to lock it to literally the only thing available – the one section of closed cart gate still remaining.

Read more.

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