Urban Velo

HouseTrike

Bike camping seems to be the rage right now, but for slower traveling nomads or those living in the city, popping up a tent in public gets you in trouble almost immediately. An Amsterdam artist, Bas Sprakel, has considered this dilemma and created an intermediate between bike camping and homeless domiciles, called the HouseTrike. The mobile temporary home includes a bed with an internal locking mechanism for safety. Sprakel is considering making adjustments in the next fabrication and taking the bike on a tour of Europe to show it’s practical nature.

To me it was important that is was multi-functional and practical for all most everybody who is living without a roof above their head. It didn’t need to be luxurious but it had to be a device solving their basic needs, both psychical and mentally. So it is a bed that can be locked from the inside so you sleep well and feel fresh the next day. The box has a lot of space to store a lot of stuff but is still small so it is stil light and easy to use. Also extended it is still small and therefore you can sleep anywhere you want, also in the city without being noticed that fast. It provides in a very sober way all the basic needs.

Tom Teesdale Suffers Heart Attack on RAGBRAI

dmrdc5-5q427cih4ew1kmbdl30j_original In sad news RAGBRAI is reporting that long time framebuilder Tom Teesdale suffered a heart attack and passed away while participating in the annual ride across Iowa on Monday the 21st. Tom was an influential craftsman having been involved in the 1980′s era Fisher bikes, and known throughout the world of small-time builders.

Son John Teesdale said his father loved his family and had a passion for bicycles.

“It’s nice — well, it’s not nice — but if you’ve got to go out, you might as well go out riding your bike,” he said.

Read more at www.ragbrai.com

Swobo Minneapolis Folsom Fist Fight

Minneapolis rules, and this is more evidence. Swobo gets it.

Dragon Shirt Sale – $5!

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Roll with the red dragon and a winning hand of cards for just $5 plus shipping. The art was originally made for our annual Spring Roll alleycat but we decided it would work well on a shirt as a standalone piece. Time to make space for a new design, pick one up while supplies last. White Gildan Dryblend 50/50 shirt, available in sizes S-XXL.
 

Price: $5.00

 

Superb Bicycle Overland Prototype

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This is my kind of bicycle. The widespread epiphany that big tires are comfortable and can take you to awesome places on a “road” bicycle has led to a number of choices in the realm of versatile frames built for real world riding rather than pure racing. Superb Bicycle just posted a few pictures of their latest efforts, the Overland. Build it with flat bars and racks for commuting and city riding, or drop bars for gravel and cyclocross endeavors. Clearance for up to 40 mm tires gives you more cushion for the pushin’, steel tubes keep it real. The prototype is 4130 steel, but Superb is threatening to make it out of Columbus Zona for that much better, and lighter, of a ride. Check out that flat crown and hooded dropouts (with replaceable hanger!). Good stuff. See more at www.superbbicycle.com

Meet the Blackburn Rangers

Meet the Blackburn Rangers, headed on the road for 2014 to use and abuse the latest equipment for months long real-life testing that the lab can’t emulate. Most of us live in cities, and most of us want to get out for an extended road trip now and again. Even if your trip is only a few hours, you might be happy that one of these people made sure that pump or pannier is good for the journey. Watch and catch some views from the Great Divide and Pacific Coast Highway routes. “Get out there.”

Rear Facing Camera Catches Driver (Deliberately?) Hit Cyclist

This one is hard to watch. Earlier this week a rider in Bullard Texas cycling on a very wide shoulder to the right of the white line was seemingly deliberately hit by a passing pickup truck. The Ford F150 pickup driven by 52-year-old Samuel Vercher clearly veers towards the cyclist as it approaches. Maybe it isn’t malice and the driver just can’t keep his giant truck in his lane and should be disqualified from driving, but I wouldn’t give this guy that much credit from my look at the video. It only takes one asshole using their vehicle as a weapon to change your family forever.

Read the local coverage of the incident at the Tyler Morning Telegraph that identifies the driver and has this quote from the Bullard Police Chief Gary Don Lewis, “We don’t know how close to the line the cyclist was traveling, but I must make it clear that the bike was not struck, it was the vehicle’s mirror that struck the cyclist. He (Vercher) was very upset that he hit the cyclist he says he never saw.”

I’d be willing to bet that nothing comes of this after the police wrap up their investigation, as the driver is using the old “I didn’t see him” excuse, which in my experience gives drivers the freedom to run over anyone they want without fear of repercussions.

Read our feature story HD Witness in Urban Velo #40 about the growing number of people using cameras to document malicious and inattentive drivers.

Kurt Boone “Bard of New York” Video Chat Tonight 7pm EST

690551609d0985630fed628feea7bd10 Join messenger, author, poet and sometimes Urban Velo contributor Kurt Boone tonight at 7pm EST at Shindig.com for a video chat and poetry reading from his recent book “Bard of New York.”

Ride Like a Girl

Oh man…this blog post by Nikki Lee is so good on many levels. Well-written, clever and right to the point…on both issues.

If one of those cars does hit you, you’re probably going to get blamed. The police will assume that you were riding unsafely, and what you could have done to better protect yourself. The driver most likely won’t be punished at all. If anything, it’ll be a slap on the wrist.

Now, a follow up post explaining ways to make both situations better would be rad.

Worksman Cycles Gallery

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Housed in a former candle factory in Queens, New York is one of America’s oldest manufacturing traditions. Worksman Cycles is a 116-year-old, family-owned bicycle maker producing machines first designed in the 1930s and whose best-selling model, says Worksman spokesman Bruce Weinreb, is not a carbon-fiber road bike but a steel tricycle designed for carrying 500-pound loads across factory floors.

From the rugged-looking building to the decades-old machines used for bending and crimping the steel tubes for the bikes, every part of the company’s business model seems to be philosophically in line with the bicycles they produce: low maintenance, no frills, and designed to last forever. For more than a century, Worksman has survived by focusing on the niche market of manufacturers needing industrial bikes to carry people and equipment on their factory floors, and Worksman show few signs of changing.

The company itself began in 1898 in a lower Manhattan store run by Morris Worksman. Worksman started out selling Columbia bikes, says Weinreb, but began selling his own design that was purpose-built for workers carrying heavy loads around the city. Worksman’s 1915 patent shows designs for a tricycle with a removable back box.


Read the rest of our feature article on Worksman Cycles in Urban Velo #42 written by Adam Kroopnick and check out an extended gallery of images from the inside of the factory by Takuya Sakamoto.

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