Urban Velo

Gevenalle BURD Cyclocross Front Derailleur

cxf_burned-300x287 Gevenalle (the artist formerly known as Retroshift) introduced the Blatantly Upgraded Rear Derailleur a couple of seasons back, taking a Microshift rear derailleur, swapping some pulleys and increasing the chain spring tension and giving riders a reasonably priced derailleur alternative better tuned for the grit of cyclocross. Now comes the Blatantly Upgraded and Rebranded Derailleur for the front shifting duties, this again uses a Microshift derailleur, this time their top-end road unit with a swapped out cage. Gevenalle removed the flimsy carbon cage and replaced it with a stiffer steel unit better tuned to the smaller double chainring sets on cyclocross, gravel riding and pro-commuter type bikes. The rear derailleur is available starting at $69, with the front derailleur $50 in either braze-on or clamp-on mounts, with economical crash replacement policies on each. See more BURD at www.gevenalle.com.

Maestro Frameworks and Adaptive Bicycles

pedal shop aug14 Local to Urban Velo framebuilder Michael Brown of Maestro Frameworks is making a name for himself building adaptive bikes, namely for Mike Trimble, a man born without arms in the wake of the Chernobyl accident who is now able to ride for pleasure and transportation. Pittsburgh Magazine ran an article about their project, and their plans to ride the 350+ miles to Washington DC together.

Early retirement from Columbia Gas in 2009 gave him an opportunity to focus solely on bikes. He apprenticed under Mike Flanigan, a legendary Boston-area bike builder, before opening Maestro Frameworks in 2011, commuting by bike from his Squirrel Hill home.

People with disabilities started seeking him out. “I didn’t go out of my way to look for this market, but people keep finding me to do custom things that nobody else would touch,” Brown says.

A Pittsburgh woman with one short arm, on which her hand protrudes from her elbow, asked Brown if he could get her on two wheels for the first time in her life. He designed a bike that allowed her to shift gears with her longer arm while resting the shorter one on a modified handlebar. He also built a bike for a young man with dwarfism who had been riding ill-fitting children’s bikes and was ecstatic to ride a high-performance bike that fit him.

Then came Trimble’s request — at that time Brown’s biggest engineering challenge to date. To design the steering system, Brown says he sat on the bike and imagined that he had no arms. His first prototype extended the bar to underneath the armpit, but that made Trimble lean to the right. The second version, which Trimble controlled with his stump, allowed him to steer.

Read the whole article at www.pittsburghmagazine.com

Bikeable Zoo

zoo2Let’s be real here…this is NOT going to happen, but sometimes design firms have too many workers and need to keep them occupied, so they pitch ideas that tend to be a little far-fetched. Maybe I’m being overly cynical here, but let’s entertain the idea of this project regardless. The Danish design firm BIG pitched a concept for overhauling the current zoo in Givskund, Denmark. In this redesign, they have spectators viewing the animals in a more direct manner, but with less perceived intrusion. One way they do this is by having people riding in, what look like, bubble bikes, with a mirrored surface so the people can’t be seen by the animals.

My first thought when I saw this design was, “Have you ever seen an animal look at itself in the mirror?” That never turns out good. I can imagine a primate or other predator animal feeling threatened by the reflection and attacking the bubble bikes, knocking them over and pounding the crap out of them. But hey, that will be an animal encounter a young child will never forget.

Then there are the mechanical issues. What happens with flat tires, broken chains, operators ignoring the red lights of the jungle and speeding through a herd’s attempt at an enclosed stampede?

Ok, I kid. Let’s look at the pictures of the Jetson’s bikes we’ll be riding in the future.
zoo3zoo1

Via AnimalNewYork

The Story of the ShurSave Bike Racks

Will-Simmons-letter-to-Shursave-620x878From BikePGH:

I do my grocery shopping by bicycle probably seven months out of the year and it’s a total bummer that I have to lock it to literally the only thing available – the one section of closed cart gate still remaining.

Read more.

NYTimes: Memorializing Traffic Deaths With An Aritist’s Touch

05jpGHOST1-master675 Last week the New York Times published an article about a group of artists memorializing pedestrian and cyclist traffic deaths with sidewalk stencils. Worth the read, Memorializing Traffic Deaths With an Artist’s Touch.

“Instead of just saying Seth died here, this is where something terrible happened, those wings are saying Seth is flying by, Seth lives here,” said his mother, Debbie Kahn, who watched the image being created. “It’s also a warning: Be aware, be careful, life is precious.”

Read the complete article at www.nytimes.com

Operation Safe Cycle

NYPDFrom The Gothamist:

Last night, the NYPD announced it was starting a “Operation Safe Cycle, a two week bicycle safety enforcement initiative,” today, August 13, through Tuesday, August 26. So… does this mean more police cruisers in the bike lane? Especially at dinner time, outside Papa John’s?

Read more.

Nutcase Unframed

Between their usual wide breadth of stock colors and now the latest limited edition Nutcase Unframed artist helmet designs there is no shortage of different styles to choose from. The first run of Nutcase Unframed edition helmets features art by Sandra Ramirez from Columbia, Ray Moore from Germany and Todd Standish from San Francisco. In addition to the helmets, art panels will be on display in the Nutcase booth at Eurobike and Interbike, and auctioned off to benefit World Bicycle Relief.

Bicycle Chain Cufflinks

photo 3Is there anything bike chains can’t be turned into? Hand-made one at a time by craft artists, Linda and Ann, in Oregon, these beautiful cufflinks are made out of reclaimed bicycle chains. Each cufflink starts as a used bicycle chain, before they go through a rigorous cleaning process in order to be hand brazed into these cycling inspired cufflinks. The four links are then brazed onto the brass base plate before they are given one final clean.

You can purchase these cufflinks through the online bicycle boutique, BicycleAge, out of Sydney Australia, for around $50 each. They come packed in a synthetic-leather case and are ready for wrapping and gifting.

2015 Frog Bikes at Eurobike

Frog-Road-58-low-res2Kids bike company, Frog Bikes, is just over a year old and still growing strong. They’ll be making an appearance at Eurobike at the end of August, showcasing their 2015 line of high-quality bikes designed for a child’s physique. Mind you, these aren’t just cheap kick bikes, but solid rides with decent components and frames ranging from balance bikes to hybrid, road, mountain and cyclocross bikes for wee humans. Frog bikes utilize narrow and short-drop handlebars, easy reach gears and brake levers, and lightweight frames at an affordable price. They aren’t available in the States just yet, but it would be great to see a more diverse line of rides available for kids over here.

Frog on Facebook
Frog on Twitter

Dahon Explorer Program

DAHON EXPLORER FLYER

Dahon has recently announced their Explorers Program, and is looking for half a dozen riders to share how they use a folding bike to explore their world. Apply and you might find yourself with a new bike.

Cyclist are encouraged to submit a brief description of why they would be a perfect brand ambassadors for DAHON and how their stories could inspire others to incorporate bike into their lifestyle.

What makes the commute to work exciting?
Where will your DAHON bike take you?
How will a folding bike change the way you live, experience the environment on a deeper level and move around without constraints?

Submissions will be accepted until August 20, 2014 at explorers@dahon.com

City Reports