Urban Velo

PDX Trophy Cup Cyclocross Photo Gallery

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From the genius of Clint Culpepper and Will Laubernds comes the PDX Trophy Cup, a weekly cyclocross race series that takes place at the world famous Portland International Raceway (PIR). Situated just minutes north of downtown Portland OR, PIR is an ideal venue for an early week training race and hangout.

PIR has hosted many cross races before, what sets the PDX Trophy Cup apart is that it takes place during that sweet spot between summer and fall, when the weather is unpredictable and you could get a beautiful sunset as the backdrop to your race or a torrential down pour and muddy, sloppy conditions to add to the already challenging course. Either way you’re going to have fun. Adding to the uncertainty of the weather is that the races begin around dusk with racing continuing well after dark, testing not only your fitness but your sense of adventure. And the courses, these are masterfully crafted and thoughtfully put together by Clint, Will and a handful of dedicated volunteers who give up their Sunday afternoons so everything is ready for Tuesday night. Every week the courses are a little different, taking advantage of the physical features found at PIR. Off cambers are carved, tree lines are taped, barriers laid, sand hills shaped, and sometimes a bit of the adjacent motocross course is incorporated into the fun.

Besides the racing, one of the best things about this series is how people have embraced it. “It gives me something to look forward to on Tuesdays.” said one sweaty participant. The people coming out to race are some of the most enthusiastic I’ve seen and heard in a long time. Most everyone that comes out to race stays until the end of the night to watch, have a beer, and do a little heckling. Did I mention beer? Not a bad way to spend a Tuesday evening. Summer is completely gone and this six race series has come to an end for this season. But a lot of Portland is already thinking about that next Tuesday night race in late Summer 2015.

Words and images submitted by Jose Sandoval. Contact us at brad@urbanvelo.org to submit your image gallery or local news reports.

Latvian Cycle Protest

bike carFrom Design Boom: During this year’s european week of sustainable mobility, a branch of latvian cyclists part of the “let’s bike it” community staged a creative protest, which effectively — and cleverly — showed that cars with single occupants take up way too much space.

This is by no means a new tactic of transportation protest, but it’s nice to see the spirit carried on, and hey, the frames might act as something of a crash proof carriage in case of collision. European Mobility Week is over, but you can get a recap of the proceedings here.

The Comedown Figure-Eight Track Test Ride

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Test riding The Comedown figure-eight track in Glasgow. Read more about the construction and inspiration behind the track in our article from last week talking with artist and sculptor Steven Murray.

Miss Platinum

I’m not entirely sure what’s going on in this Warriors type of scenario, but the repeated cameo’s by some fixed gang rocking Monkey Lights on their spokes is pretty cool.

I Love Riding in the City – Joe Pierce

RIP

NAME: Joe Pierce
LOCATION: St Louis
OCCUPATION: Public Servant

Where do you live and what’s it like riding in your city?
I live in St Louis near the Chain of Rocks Bridge, old Route 66. The bridge has been closed to cars and trucks since the 60′s. Bikes and foot traffic only.

I moved here from Chicago and was intimated at first but got over it. The city is working very had at their Bicycle Friendly status and I’ve ridden on the streets and commuted here since 98 and feel it’s come a long way. The region has issues with cyclists that will be resolved someday.

What was your favorite city to ride in, and why?
I’ve ridden in Chicago, Cleveland, San Diego, Sturgeon Bay, St Louis, and Pittsburgh and I have to say Chicago is probably my favorite.

Why do you love riding in the city?
There is a lot less stress riding a bike. I love how you are part of your surroundings not separated by glass and metal to everything. I’ve seen much more of nature while ridding and I’ve found money on the road. That would not happen while driving a car.

Paul Component Engineering Thumbie Shifter Mounts Review

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Top-mount thumbshifters are a classic design that the big players have left behind in the race to make a “better” shifter. Other designs are undeniably more ergonomic and capable of faster shifts, all without changing your grip on the bars. But some of us are hooked on thumbshifters, if for nothing else than their proven durability through simplicity. No matter the conditions, no matter the muck and cold, thick gloves and rust, thumbshifters continue to shift. In fact, I still have two pairs of 20+ year old Suntour thumbshifters in service on bikes, along with this set of Paul Thumbies that I’ve been running for over 5 years.

Paul Thumbies are the answer to those of us that want indexing beyond 8-speeds or SRAM or Campagnolo compatibility but want to run top-mounts too. These mounts transform bar end and time-trial shifters into old school thumbshifters. My poison? 9-speed Shimano bar end shifters mated to Paul Thumbies, run in friction mode on my 10-speed dirt road touring rig. Adjustable front derailleur trim and you can shift the entire cassette in one movement with the right touch. I’d go so far as to say, “It works every time!” but I’m to understand the phrase has already been taken. This is a shifter for the tinkerers and the explorers, best suited to people with a secret stash of parts and more ideas about bike setup than available rides to test it.

Paul Thumbies are available for $74 per pair in either silver or black, in either 22.2, 26.0 or 31.8 clamp sizes (mountain bars and road stem clamp sizes) and with Shimano, SRAM, Microshift or Campagnolo mounts. Current Thumbies have hinged clamps for easier installation and removal.

Gallant Bicycles

Gallant Bicycles (who happen to be directly below the YNOT space) have launched this kickstarter to bring their advanced customization bike frames to market. Unique from most entry level customized bikes, Gallant is offering higher quality products and more options to customize at similar price points, instead of just letting the buyer choose color schemes and bar options. Gallant is looking to get initial backer rewards out by the beginning of 2015 or Spring at the latest, some of which can entail full builds.

MOBB Weekend

PrintThe Atlanta cycling club is throwing this MOBB weekend shindig on Oct 24 – 26 consisting of various rides, parties, a checkpoint race and more. Checkpoint race participants are shooting for a Leader frame, cash and a Chrome jersey.

More specifics can be found on the MOBB Facebook page.

Lezyne Gauge Drive HP Pump Review

lezyne_hp-8 Compact hand pumps are a must-have item on the road; ride more than a few miles from home and you’re bound to get a flat. The $50 Lezyne Gauge Drive HP is an aluminum bodied pump meant for high pressure, low volume tires and equipped with an in-line pressure gauge meant as a step up from cheap feeling plastic bodied mini pumps. If nothing else the shiny aluminum feels good in your hand, even if I’ve never been one to tear through plastic pumps. At 230 mm long the Gauge Drive HP fits in a jersey pocket and larger seatbags, or use the provided bottle cage mount. The handle side hides a the hose and in-line gauge inflator which has a reversible Presta or Schrader chuck with a bleed valve. Screw the hose into the end of the pump body, careful to not cross-thread the plastic fitting, and go. Over the past season the Lezyne Gauge Drive HP has bailed out a few flat tires and aired up the travel bike outside the airport. The ABS Pen Gauge gives a reasonable ballpark pressure reading on the side of the road, but you’ll be hard pressed to tell a 10 psi difference with it. Be mindful of not unscrewing the gauge itself as I once did and avoid a momentary heartrate spike (I was able to put the gauge back together on the spot). The screw-on Presta chuck and small section of hose go a long way to help prevent broken valve stems out on the road, which happens to be the most common and least convenient place to break them. Like any small pump it’s going to take some effort to get to riding pressure with a road tire, but it will keep you rolling and is able to get to 100+ psi without spending all day.

Arnette Anything But Video Series

Arnette interviews their athletes about the passions that are separate from their primary interests, in this case, pro skater Mark Appleyard discusses what appeals to him about cycling. I love his unpretentious approach to riding, sans brand name dropping, or over-romanticized notions of what it is to ride. He’s just a dude enjoying the bike.

Via Monster Children

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